STYLE & ÉTIQUETTE ADVICE

Your most frequent style & étiquette questions are answered.

Choosing the Right Fabrics for You

Wearing a shirt made from a beautiful fabric is one of life’s truest pleasures. Your suit, the season, and the event, meeting or occasion should all be considered when selecting the best fabric (or shirting) for your day-to-day wardrobe. A selection of the following will keep you well and truly covered.

Poplin

Lightweight, with a crisp feel, poplin is perfect for warmer weather and does not require starch.

Herringbone


Often woven with two colours to enhance weave design, this fabric has a smooth touch and silky finish.

Dobby

Dobby is a luxurious shirting that is very soft to the touch and feel.

Pinpoint Oxford

A soft feel fabric with a high lustre, which makes it a popular choice for wedding shirts.  Excellent all purpose shirt that performs well with or without starch.

Twill

A very fine diagonal weave makes this shirting perfect for dressing up, it responds well to a light starch. King Twill combines the elegance of twill with a more prominent visual texture.

Chelsea

A classic overcheck fabric that combines luxury with versatility.

End on End

White threads alternate with colour to give overall appearance of colour with interesting texture on closer inspection.

Panama

A worsted fabric of plain weave and square construction.

Prince of Wales Check

The original Prince of Wales check is red-brown on a white ground, with a slate-grey overcheck.

And some key definitions ... to help you become a more informed shirting connoisseur:

Thread Count

Tells you how many threads were used to make the fabric. A higher thread count gives a softer smoother feel.

Ply

The ply is how many threads are twisted together before they are woven. Double ply makes for a stronger and more durable fabric. 2×2 (where warp and weft are both double ply) is the strongest ply.

Staple Length

Refers to the raw cotton from which the yarn is spun. The longer and more fine the staple the more luxurious the fabric as it can be woven into the tightest yarn.

See the Edward Stripe Collection for a range of fabric choices.